Saturday, October 14, 2017

Citywide Blackout, Oct. 12, 2017: The Joker/Clown Prince of Fashion/Lynne Heinzmann

Clown Prince of Fashion
We've got a one-of-a-kind guest to open tonight's show. The Clown Prince of Crime, the Joker! He's visiting Boston and hopes to make his mark on the city. We talk about his various origins, the rest of Gotham's rogues gallery, and his long-standing dance with a certain pointy-eared vigilante. 

I manage to survive my encounter with Mr. J, and then have the pleasure of talking to cosplay artist The Clown Prince of Fashion. We met at the recent Granite-State Comic-Con, which was actually his first time in costume. He's taken on a number of Joker roles, and we talk about how he makes his costumes, other characters he'd like to try, and the joy of meeting the fans.

Author Lynne Heinzmann joins me to talk about her first book, "Frozen Voices," a historical fiction tale that focuses on four characters from the doomed ship, the Larchmont, which sank with nearly all hands in 1907. She learned of the story of the Larchmont and began a years-long research project to learn all she could about it. We also talk about her experience at different book conventions.


Blackout Bootleg: Granite-State Comic-Con

Welcome to the Blackout Bootleg Series, where the crew from Citywide Blackout goes to the conventions, shows, and festivals, to bring you the best of New England's local entertainment in their backyards. This podcast is a collection of interviews from the recent Granite State Comic-Con, held in September in Manchester NH.

First up, we've got Christopher Paniccia, author of the Gridiron Conspiracy series.

Next is Mark Tufo, author of the Zombie Fallout Series and The Indian Hill Trilogy.
I also speak to Ariele Sieling, author of The Wounded World, The Clock Winked, The Lonely Whelk, and the Rutherford the Unicorn Sheepbooks.

Last but not least, Emily Rhain Andrews, illustrator of the comic series Mag Na Mell.

Saturday, October 7, 2017

Oct. 5, 2017: Rozy, Miko, and Machi/Ken Garlick/I am James

Opening the show, we've got Rozy of the New York-based band Rozy, Miko, and Machi. These three have a cool style that blends elements of 60s classic rock, 70s psychadelic and 90s alt-rock. We talk about the scene in New York, their recent single release, and their own production style.

Next up, author Ken Garlick shares his ghost/thriller story "Call Me Madame Alice." This is is first book, and he shares the range of characters, the extensive research he did with the real-life inspiration for his story, and the response he's gotten from the public and editor.

Singer-songwriter Sierra Cassidy is back with a brand new project, I Am James, a more pop-influenced style. She's also started a new life in Nashville, having moved there a month ago. Along with the new sound, we talk about her time playing there and plans now that she's started this new journey.


Thursday, September 28, 2017

Sept. 28, 2017: Gentle Temper/Lauren Kelley/The Rationales

Max Bowen and David Mirabella 
First up on the show, we've got the folk duo of Gentle Temper, Ryan Meier and Marion Earley. From a recent open mic win, this amazing pair of musicians have a number of shows lined up. We talk about their family influences and what role they played in their musical careers. Ryan and Marion also play some great acoustic tunes.

Author Lauren Kelley is next with her children's book series, "Tuggie The Patriot Pup." Based in New England, the series chronicles some of the major events in our country's history, all through the eyes of a small dog. Lauren shares the making of the series and her plans to continue it for a full 13 books. Lauren will be a part of the upcoming Rhode Island Author Expo in December and we also talk about her experience at different conventions.

Closing out the show is David Mirabella of the band The Rationales. The ban recently released a new album, "Upstream," to rave reviews both locally and nationwide. The band has been around for a decade, and we talk about their growth both musically and as people. The Rationales have long been a part of Boston's Americana scene, and we talk about how it's changed and the many faces that make it up.

Sunday, September 24, 2017

Sept. 21, 2017: Laurel Ostiguy/Toke the Closer

BADD with Toke the Closer and his team
This week, we see the debut of Citywide Blackout Street Team member Gina House, as she interviews the band The Last King. 

Plus, author Laurel Ostiguy opens our series of interviews of members of the upcoming 5th Annual Rhode Island Author Expo. Laurel's two books into her new Onondoga State series, and we talk about the different characters, how one spawned their own story, and how she's planned out the series. Laurel even treats us to an on-air reading from book.

Hip-hop author Toke the Closer has brought his entire production team with him to wrap up the show! He's been making music for years, and we talk about how he managed to craft his quick and precise style, how the music he makes has evolved, and future releases.

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Blackout Bootleg: Mass Indie Film Festival

Max and special guest host Ben Chou talk to the organizer and creators who submitted works to the annual Mass Indie Film Festival.


Monday, September 18, 2017

Sept. 14, 2017: Berklee College of Music/Whoopi Sticks/Sondro Castro

Whoopi Sticks 

It was a packed house on last week's show, where I talked to Tony Brown of birnCORE, along with Berklee College of Music students Gerson Eguiguren, Kaya Miller, and Chris Allison about their recent recording session with legendary guitarist Kaki King. The students talk about their favorite songs and what it was like working with her.

Next, it's the 246th appearance of the punk bank Whoopi Sticks! OK, not that many, but not too far off, either. Max and the band give the 411 on their next shows, and play lots of great new tunes.

Hip-hop artist Sondro Castro rounds out the program with a look at his own long career, which includes working with his son. We share a few shoutouts to those working in the local scene, and Sondro spreads the message that no artist stands apart, and the need to work together.